Feed on
Posts
Comments

Monthly Archive for September, 2017

Throughout this story, the narrator, Shaila, struggles with her version of grief. She is numb and calm, though she feels the despair rip through her heart. Her brain, trying to cope, places visions of her family around her. She hears their voices at night, some part of her still tightly holding on because “it is […]

Read Full Post »

“Girls clung to my stand, like the shipwrecked to their raft, and I could do no wrong.” In the “The Lifeguard,” by Mary Morris, the story’s theme is about ego and pride. In the beginning of the story we meet the main character and narrator Josh Micheals, who appears to be rather full of himself. […]

Read Full Post »

That was when I saw Ric Spencer, running across the burning sand, waving his arms in an awkward way. He ran forward, then back, then  forward again, like a dog wanting to play catch. He kept waving, shouting, then rushing back again. Then, Mr. Potter, whose own failing heart kept him pacing the shore, came puffing to me. “A child,” […]

Read Full Post »

“The Lifeguard” by Mary Morris is a first-person narrative. The narrator, Josh Michaels is a lifeguard during the summer at Pirate’s Point. He comes off as a very egotistical person, who only sees his job as a way to have fame. We see this in the following quote:   “So I loved to stroll along […]

Read Full Post »

The story “The Lifeguard” shows perfectly just how a single instant can change someone’s whole life. From the start when Billy drowned because his father needed to take a phone call to Josh when ruined his date with Peggy by asking about said drowning, every event in the story takes place in a single moment […]

Read Full Post »

I watched them curiously, these people whose life had been irrevocably altered with the sweep of a wave. Morris’ story “The Lifeguard” is a coming of age story that shows how true character is developed through hands-on experience. This story also shows how quickly one’s life can be altered at any given moment and how one must always see the […]

Read Full Post »

I’ve seen monsters rise from the belly of the deep when it’s only a big fish leaping into the air. (p. 427) Mary Morris’ short story “The Lifeguard” addresses the theme of death through the protagonist’s job of a lifeguard. The lifeguard, who is prepared for disasters that can occur within the ocean, even takes […]

Read Full Post »

It was the first time I felt what it was supposed to feel like to be in the arms of a woman, not the girls whose breath steamed my car on Saturday nights. But it was not her body I felt, though I liked the feel of it, it was not her sex, though I […]

Read Full Post »

In the story “The Lifeguard,” is told in first-person retrospective. The lifeguard is telling the story of his last summer before college. The lifeguard is self-centered at the beginning of the story. “I was eighteen then. I wore zinc oxide on my nose, a whistle around my neck. No. 4 Coppertone covered my body. I […]

Read Full Post »

I’ve never seen the water or the umbrellas of summer in the same way again. (431) Mary Morris’ story “The Lifeguard” is about events changing our perspective. The narrator and main character, Josh Michaels, begins the story by flaunting his ——– what he thinks to be — superior status to the beach-goers. He braggs about […]

Read Full Post »

In “The Lifeguard,” Morris suggests that one’s age has less to due with years passing and more to due with life experiences. The narrator says, “I loved my body that summer. I loved its firmness and its bronzed skin. But mostly I loved the way it was admired.” (427) By all accounts, he is physically mature, […]

Read Full Post »

Mary Morris, “The Lifeguard.”

I felt myself longing for something I could never have, and I wanted her to take me back, fold me inside of herself as she’d folded Becky that afternoon. But then she let me go. I grabbed at her trying to hold on, as if her arms could save me from what came next. (Morris, […]

Read Full Post »

Mary Morris’ “Lifeguard”

The saying ignorance is bliss is something society has come to accept as true. However, in Mary Morris’ “Lifeguard,” uses this saying ironically, as ignorance becomes bathos. The following is the anticlimax that ignorance has brought about. Sally Spencer, who’d once dug her nails into my arm during horror movies of my youth, now did so again. “you’re a […]

Read Full Post »

Then Mrs. Lovenheim turned to me where I stood, first-aid kit dangling in my hand like a lunch box. I felt as if she were about to say or do something, but instead, without a word, she moved past me back to her umbrella, collected her things, and left” (430). These two sentences really summed […]

Read Full Post »

“In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried” by Amy Hampel, has many Allusions, but one stands out the most and that is the sign language chimp. It stands out not because its mentioned multiple time, but because it has a deeper connection with what’s going on. It becomes a symbol within the story, as […]

Read Full Post »

She wants every minute, I thought.  She wants my life. In the short story by Amy Hempel the reader encounters two young women who remain unamed. One woman is clearly sick in the hospital, and the other woman I believe is meant to be the “supportive” friend. Despite these rolls the characters are meant to […]

Read Full Post »

“Tell me things I won’t mind forgetting,” she said. “Make it useless stuff or skip it.” I began. I told her insects fly through rain, missing every drop, never getting wet. I told her no one in America owned a tape recorder before Bing Crosby did. I told her the shape of the moon is like a banana — you […]

Read Full Post »

Amy Hempel’s “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried” begins in medias res. Beginning the story in the middle of the action gives the reader insight into the reoccurring idea of the story– fear of the inevitable. The narrator, a loyal companion to her sick and dying friend (also the protagonist and referred to as Best Friend), tells her friend […]

Read Full Post »

But the beach is standing still today. Everyone on it is tranquilized, numb, or asleep…They pose” (4). This passage shows that the main character can sense the hollow feeling of the people on the beach. They almost identify with going through the motions just to get through the moment. The teenage girls put on suntan […]

Read Full Post »

If one had to choose a singular mood that encompasses the entirety of this story, I would choose denial. It keeps the Best Friend from spiraling into depression at her situation and keeps the narrator from doing it for her. The trivial bits of information we receive as we read are one of the coping […]

Read Full Post »

Amy Hempel’s “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried” starts in medias res and is narrated in first person through the main character: a young unnamed woman, occasionally referred to as “the Best Friend.” The narrator struggles with her friend’s illness and impeding death, and often uses sarcasm to evade the subject when it comes up, […]

Read Full Post »

Throughout Amy Hempel’s story, “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried” there is a conversation that is revisited that compares the life of Al Jolson to that of a lab test chimp. “Did you know that when they taught the first chimp to talk, it lied? That when they asked her who did it […]

Read Full Post »

Amy Hempel’s story “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried” follows a central idea of a chimp. First introduced by the speaker telling her friend about the first speaking chimp on page one. “Did you know that when they taught the first chimp to talk, it lied? That when they asked her who did […]

Read Full Post »

I wanted her to be afraid with me. But she said, “I don’t know. I’m just not.” She was afraid of nothing, not even of flying. This story by Amy Hempel is very different from other short stories. She doesn’t give the readers any names for the characters except “The Best Friend”, “The Good Doctor”, […]

Read Full Post »

In the story,”In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried,” the narrator is afriaid of death and refuses to accept that her friend will die. Even when her friend does die, the narrator refuses to visit the grave or attend the funeral. The narrator fears death and dying alone. On the the morning she was […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »