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Below are the beginning paragraphs from an essay by the author Aminatta Forna in the magazine World Literature Today. You can read the complete essay here. Human beings tell stories. This is a fact. Every society, however differently organized and structured, whether founded on the values of matriarchy or patriarchy, whether agricultural, sea-going, peaceful, or warmongering, tells […]

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“You’ve left me in a real place.” Out of the three stories by Belle Bogg’s I fount “Election Day” the most interesting story. I found it interesting because not so much of the plot but because of how it was written. The immense amount of description in the story creates a very vivid picture. When […]

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Belle Boggs’ “Deer Season”

If this story were told using only one perspective, it would lose a lot of the emotion the author wrote in it. Using more than one perspective means we can see multiple views on the same event. We see how each of these characters goes about the day affected by the first day of hunting […]

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Although Bruce would never admit it, Ronnie knew that Susanna hated the reservation, hated making beaded jewelry and dancing in the annual tribal dances. Hated their little cinder block museum with its Stone Age relics. Good luck with that, kid, she pictured her saying. when what she really wanted to hear was this: Jesus, Ron, […]

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The title of this story implies a certain amount of hope. This idea of hope implied in the title is sharply contrasted with the sense of dread the narrator feels towards her pregnancy. Although she is happy to be pregnant, saying, “Part of her wished she could just stay pregnant.” (7) When I first read […]

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Anyway, Mrs. Hayes probably thinks Jason wishes he were out hunting, ha, what a joke. Jason’s dad offered to take him…but then he never called back when he said he would. He was probably waiting for Jason to call him back, and Jason was busy…Jason doesn’t think he could shoot something as helpless as a deer anyway.” This […]

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In Belle Boggs’ “Good New for a Hard Time,” the third person limited point of view allows readers to see into Ronnie’s emotions, but we don’t get to feel the personal connection just as Ronnie is missing a personal connection with her mother. After Ronnie drops out of college, she comes back to her father […]

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Belle Boggs’ “Good News for a Hard Time” explores the ways in which the loss of a parent can impact a child, while also touching on differences in social classes and the additional struggle this can cause. Ronnie is understandably resentful of her mother’s leaving and her father’s simple acceptance of this, but shows a clear inability […]

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Belle Boggs “Deer Season”

Belle Boggs “Deer Season”, is written in the third person and consists of characters that fit common stereotypes. One of the stereotypes that are explored in this story is gender roles.  Gender roles are seen in this story when most of the male students don’t attend school so that they can go hunting, while the […]

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Belle Boggs’ “Deer Season”

On the first day of dear season the high school is deserted of all the boys. This is expected by the teachers, who will chat with the girls and show movies all day… (3) The deer, in literature, symbolizes a search for wisdom or the ability to move through life’s problems gracefully. The irony of […]

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It was like love, she thought. Something you thought you should have until it was right there in front of you and you realized you were committed to it whole. (20) Throughout this story the reader can grasp the sense that Ronnie is not exactly happy in her relationship with Jeremy. It seems as if […]

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Belle Boggs’ “Deer Season”

Belle Boggs’ “Deer Season” takes the reader through the minds of all of the characters in the story, and portrays what the first day of deer season means to each of them. What is so beautiful about the way in which this story is written, is that the reader feels a personal connection to each […]

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This story is told in third person omniscience. This point of view lets the reader see the thoughts of the staff and the remaining students on the first day of deer season. Each person seems to be lost in their thoughts: The principal thinking of tomorrow’s conversations, Jenny thinking about her charcoal drawing of dried roses, […]

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Haruki Murakami’s “The Elephant Vanishes” is written in first person narrative. We are given the perspective of a man who works at a magazine company. From his point of view we are not able to find out exactly what happened to the Elephant or his keeper, but we are given what the narrator thought he […]

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“I felt like this a lot after my experience with the vanishing elephant. I would begin to think I wanted to do something, but then I would become incapable of distinguishing between the probable results of doing it and of not doing it.” (465) This story represents anxiety. I do not know if the elephant […]

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I am one of those people who read the paper from beginning to end, in order. (453) This story is told from the first person, retrospective point of view. The narrator holds a factual retelling of the case of the vanishing elephant with an intelligent, suspicious tone. This is a creative narration in the story […]

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For example, the article used such expressions as ‘the elephant escaped’ but if you looked at the entire piece it became obvious that the elephant had in no way ‘escaped.’ It had vanished into thin air.” With the peculiar disappearance of the town elephant, the main character becomes almost obsessed with the event. There is […]

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“The elephant and keeper have vanished completely. They will never be coming back.” “The Elephant Vanishes” by Haruki Murakami is by far one of the most dissapointing stories I have ever read. At the same time, it is exceedingly intriguing; its like a mystery novel in a short story except there is no resolution. Various […]

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… people are looking for a kind of unity in this kit-chin we know as the world. (465) The narrator, in Haruki Murakami’s “The Elephant Vanishes,” has an odd attraction towards the disappearance of the town’s elephant and its keeper.  The narrator admits to keeping a scrapbook full of newspaper clippings about the disappearance and […]

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Haruki Murakami uses figurative language, such as metaphors, hyperboles, symbolism, and personification, in “The Elephant Vanishes.” Figurative language plays an important role in most literature including Haruki Murakami’s story. The figurative language in this story helps the reader become a part of the story and picture the events as if they have seen it, rather […]

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While reading the story “The Elephant Vanishes,” we as readers never get the answer to the questions of why the narrator is so interested in the elephant and how it started initially. He mentions on page 454 that he had his own “private interest in the elephant problem from the very outset. . .” but […]

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The narrator of this story tells the readers about an elephant that has mysteriously vanished from its home, along with its keeper. The readers never understand why the narrator is so in to knowing about the elephant or why he keeps a scrap book with all of the articles about the elephant. Towards the end […]

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In “The Elephant Vanishes” by Haruki Murakami, the narrator is obsessed with an old elephant that his town comes in possession of. Strangely the Elephant mirrors the narrator and the parallels can be seen in a couple of ways. One of the ways is in the way he describes his job. He says it’s “not the kind […]

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I feel as though Murakami’s “The Elephant Vanishes” captures so many of the complexities of human happiness and suffrage. As the narrator tries to discover more about what has happened to the vanishing elephant, he also discovers a part of himself that is complicated, mysterious, and not so easy to solve. That’s probably because people […]

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‘The Elephant Vanishes” is told in first-person. The narrator relays the events that involve the elephant: how the elephant vanishes, how he saw the elephant shrink, and how the disappearance affects the narrator. “The elephant’s absence had first been noticed at two o’clock on the afternoon of May 18–the day before–when men from the school-lunch […]

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