Feed on
Posts
Comments

Monthly Archive for August, 2016

In T.C. Boyle’s “Rara Avis,” the narrator begins the story with the chaotic discovery of an oddly still bird. This bird draws attention from all over the town. It attracts strangers who are just passing through, regulars who frequent the neighborhood, and people of all ages. This bird quickly hypnotizes the people within this town. Within […]

Read Full Post »

The First Day

“My shoes are my greatest joy, black patent-leather miracles, and when one is nicked at the toe later that morning in class, my heart will break.” The second time I read this passage, it really spoke out to me. This young girl is off to her first day of school with her mother. And when her […]

Read Full Post »

And even when the teacher turns me toward the classrooms and I hear what must be the singing and talking of all the children in the world, I can still hear my mother’s footsteps above it all. In Edward P. Jones‘s short story “The First Day,” the narrator’s mother is determined to get her five-year-old […]

Read Full Post »

“The First Day”

Edward P. Jones’ short story The First Day is a coming-of-age story and a love story between mother and daughter. This story is about a woman looking back on her first day of school. Her mother dresses her up in her Sunday’s best and “uncharacteristically spent nearly an hour on my hair that morning.” Then she […]

Read Full Post »

The house breathed death and freedom. – “Rara Avis” by T.C Boyle In this moment of the story, the personification of the house, and the “death and freedom” (Boyle, 108) the narrator claims it offers, parallels that of the qualities of the bird on the roof of the furniture store. When the boy first discovers […]

Read Full Post »

“Whenever I turn my head quickly, my nose fills with the faint smell of Dixie Peach hair grease… Just inside the front door, women out of the advertisements in Ebony are greeting other parents and children.”- “The First Day” by Edward P. Jones In “The First Day” by Edward P. Jones, the narrator uses details […]

Read Full Post »

A Deeper look.

” The glare of the fire tore disordered lines across people’s eyes and dug furrows in their cheeks. ”  Rara Avis, T. Coraghessan Boyle page 107. The personification of the fire used in this sentence sets an eerie feeling as if the fire itself is the cause of the pain and distortion on the people […]

Read Full Post »

Rara Avis

“I looked at the shadowy grill, looked toward the source of the soothing voice of absolution, the voice of forgiveness and hope, and I lied.” P.108 T. C. Boyle’s Rara Avis begins with the sighting of a rare bird, causing quite a distraction in the town. This quote specifically shows the main character is having a flashback […]

Read Full Post »

“I can still hear my mother’s footsteps above it all.” This sentence is incredibly symbolic to this story and resonates the importance of these characters. It  reveals truth and delivers a door to an in-depth discussion on respectability politics, hierarchy, and physical appearance both economically and socially in the black community. Throughout the story, there […]

Read Full Post »

The First Day by Edward P. Jones

“My mother is now diseased, according to the girl’s eyes, and until the moment her mother takes her and the form to the auditorium, the girl never stops looking at my mother.” In Edward P. Jones’ “The First Day,” there is a distinct difference between the mother and daughter. The mother doesn’t have a good […]

Read Full Post »

“In an otherwise unremarkable September morning, long before I learned to be ashamed of my mother, she takes my hand and we set off  down New Jersey Avenue to begin my first day of school.” I believe that this excerpt from the story “The First Day” by Edward P. Jones is important because it tells […]

Read Full Post »

Strewn about the floor are dozens and dozens of pieces of white paper, and people are walking over them without any thought of picking them up.  And seeing this lack of concern, I am all of a sudden afraid. Reading up to this point in the passage, the reader sees that the narrator and her […]

Read Full Post »

“Behind my ears, my mother, to stop my whining, has dabbed the stingiest bit of her gardenia perfume, the last present my father gave her before he disappeared into memory.” I feel this sentence is important to the story because it gives a more in depth view on the narrators life. Out of this sentence […]

Read Full Post »

  ‘I can’t read it. I don’t know how to read or write, and i’m asking you to help me.’ My mother looks at me, then looks away. I know almost all of her looks, but this one is brand new to me. –Edward P. Jones, “The First Day” In the short story “The First […]

Read Full Post »

Secret, raw, red, and wet, the wound flashed just above the juncture of the legs before the wind died and the feathers fell back in place. In the short story “Rara Avis” by T. Coraghessan Boyle, a young boy notices a large black bird on the top of a roof in his small town. For […]

Read Full Post »

Create a post on the blog in which you present and discuss one sentence (or, at most two) from one of the stories we’re reading for Tuesday, August 30: Edward P. Jones’s “The First Day” and T.C. Boyle’s “Rara Avis.” You are welcome to discuss any aspect of the sentence — its importance in the […]

Read Full Post »

I remember when, years ago, I would read Donald Justice’s poem “Men at Forty” with a kind of anticipatory nostalgia, imagining the sweet melancholy I would feel when I left my thirties behind and joined the legions of men who must, as Justice puts it, “learn to close softly / The doors to rooms they […]

Read Full Post »

Ted Hughes, “Wind”

The wind flung a magpie away and a black- Back gull bent like an iron bar slowly… — Ted Hughes, “Wind” This poem is full of remarkable metaphors: a house “far out at sea all night,” the woods “crashing through darkness,” the “skyline a grimace,” the house ringing “like some fine green goblet in the […]

Read Full Post »